We work differently to other NGOs

When we set up Project Girl Code, we wanted to do something about child sexual exploitation but didn't want to "reinvent the wheel".

We were passionated about establishing a charity, but wanted to avoid replicating the work of several other successful, fully-established organisations and programs.

Fast forward three years, and we've created an entirely new concept that supports local NGOs and provides access to something they may not already have: digital curriculum, IT instructors and industry connections.

Local & Cost Effective

We use existing infrastructure and networks to keep costs low and set up quickly. We partner with established anti-trafficking NGOs who have prevention projects or who are rescuing girls from the sex trade. NGOs we choose to help already have a rehabilitation program in place which includes catch-up school education, restorative work and holistic care. 

Once on the ground, we aim to operate sustainably: training and employing local (usually female) instructors, engaging the services of in-country organisations, buying, leveraging and using existing equipment and software, covering internet connectivity costs and encouraging the local economy in any way possible. 

Relevant & Resourceful

When deciding on curriculum and vocational training pathways we reverse-engineer the process. We first look at the local tech industry and find jobs that are in-demand. We then cooperate with IT training academies and leverage their connections and networks. We work to create pathways to employment based on the needs of both the local and international market.

As a Cisco Networking Academy, we are also able to award world-recognised certifications and recognise competencies. The end goal is getting young women into meaningful careers, so we make sure that our students are equipped to meet the market and have opportunities for employment after vocational training has been completed.